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South Africa and the National Peace Accord
March 1995

Signed by all the major political and labor leaders in 1991, the National Peace Accord-- a countrywide network of peace committees at the local, regional, and national levels--served as an extraordinary and daring experiment in conflict resolution. Gastrow describes the initiatives and events that led to the signing of the accord, exploring in particular the important roles played by religious groups and the business community. Noting that the NPA is without precedent internationally, he examines its impact on political violence, the democratization process, and socio-economic reconstruction and development in South Africa.

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9781878379399
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9781878379405
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Sustainable Reconciliation in Divided Societies
February 1998

A major work from a seminal figure in the field of conflict resolution, Building Peace is John Paul Lederach's definitive statement on peacebuilding. Marrying wisdom, insight, and passion, Lederach explains why we need to move beyond "traditional" diplomacy, which often emphasizes top-level leaders and short-term objectives, toward a holistic approach that stresses the multiplicity of peacemakers, long-term perspectives, and the need to create an infrastructure that empowers resources within a society and maximizes contributions from outside.

Sophisticated yet pragmatic, the volume explores the dynamics of contemporary conflict and presents an integrated framework for peacebuilding in which structure, process, resources, training, and evaluation are coordinated in an attempt to transform the conflict and effect reconciliation.

Building Peace is a substantive reworking and expansion of a work developed for the United Nations University in 1994. In addition, this volume includes a chapter by practitioner John Prendergast that applies Lederach's conceptual framework to ongoing conflicts in the Horn of Africa.

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9781878379733
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9781601270924
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9781878379740
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Building Peace in a Time of War
July 2009

Bringing together the experiences and insights of more than thirty experienced and emerging authors, human rights activists, and peace practitioners from Colombia and abroad, Colombia: Building Peace in a Time of War documents and analyzes the vast array of peace initiatives that have emerged in Colombia in recent years. The volume explores how local and regional initiatives relate to national efforts, provides insights into the negotiating practices of the past two decades, and identifies possible synergies. Additionally, it examines the multiple roles of civil society and the international community in the country's complex search for peace. Its textured conclusions offer a wide spectrum of analytical and practical lessons for Colombia and those seeking to transform violent conflicts in other parts of the globe.

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9781601270382
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9781601270399
$65.00
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Peace and Conflict Resolution in Islam
October 2010

In the face of overwhelming attention to extremist movements and the fundamentalist Islam they often espouse, exploration of peacemaking and conflict resolution in Muslim communities is especially timely. Crescent and Dove looks at the relationship between contemporary Islam and peacemaking by tackling the diverse interpretations, concepts, and problems in the field of Islamic peacemaking.

Although Islamic law requires followers to preserve and protect life, and peacemaking efforts arise in Muslim communities everywhere, those who advocate for Islamic principles of nonviolence and peacebuilding, as well as traditional methods of conflict resolution, face serious challenges. Writing from their perspective as Muslim scholars and peacebuilding practitioners, the contributors offer critical perspectives on what works, what opportunities exist, and what areas are fertile for effective peacebuilding efforts. Their experience and analysis demonstrate that fostering a culture of peace in Muslim communities and building effective conflict resolution practices must occur within an Islamic framework and must engage Muslim leaders.

Crescent and Dove addresses both theory and practice by delving into the intellectual heritage of Islam to discuss historical examples of addressing conflict in Islam and exploring the practical challenges of contemporary peacemaking in Arab countries, Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, and Indonesia. These groundbreaking essays offer possibilities for nonviolent interventions, peacemaking, the implementation of human rights, the reinterpretation of texts, peace education instruction, and employing successful mediation, negotiation, and conflict resolution skills in an Islamic context.

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9781601270603
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Local Peace Committees and National Peacebuilding
September 2013

In places as diverse as South Africa, Northern Ireland, and Nepal, negotiators of national peace plans have for years sanctioned the creation of local peace committees (LPCs) to address community-level sources of grievance and thereby to build peace from the bottom up. Peace practitioners working with LPCs around the globe have operated in the hope that such a robust peace infrastructure that facilitates collaboration between all sectors and levels of society, including government, would finally bring lasting peace to societies entrenched in conflict.

Yet LPCs themselves and their contribution to larger peacebuilding efforts have to date been poorly understood and little analyzed. In A Crucial Link: Local Peace Committees and National Peacebuilding, longtime practitioner Andries Odendaal engages in the first comparative study of LPCs and asks where and if the committees have actually succeeded. Odendaal weaves together practical experience, peacebuilding theory, recent cases, and practical guidelines for setting up and supporting the work of these local committees.

Odendaal finds that LPCs can be critical in establishing social cohesion, facilitating dialogue, and preventing violence. Through their unique ability to engage the particular local aspects of conflict not shared throughout a country in conflict, LPCs can foster the success of national agreements, especially hen they are formally supported and embedded in a larger peace infrastructure.

In-depth case studies provide keen insights into the successes and potential challenges to implementing LPCs. Explaining the dynamics of LPCs and their relationship to national efforts, Odendaal makes a compelling case for increased use of LPCs across conflicts. Building on two decades of theory on the necessity of society-level approaches to peacebuilding, this volume is a must read for anyone working to promote peace in divided societies.

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9781601271815
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9781601271808
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August 2008

Managing the Mediation Process offers an overview of the process of mediating interstate and intrastate conflicts. Each of its six chapters covers a different step in the process, identifying what needs to be done at that step and how best to accomplish it:

• Assess the Conflict
• Ensure Mediator Readiness
• Ensure Conflict Ripeness
• Conduct Track-I Mediation
• Encourage Track-II Dialogue
• Construct a Peace Agreement

Consolidating the practical wisdom of managing a mediation process into an easily digestible format, this handbook is designed to help mediators identify areas where they may need more research or preparation, as well as options and strategies relevant to the particular case on which they are working. Examples from past mediation efforts are provided.

Managing the Mediation Process is the first of six handbooks in The Peacemaker’s Toolkit series and deals largely with Track-I efforts. Each handbook in the series addresses a particular facet of the work of mediating violent conflicts, including such topics as negotiating with terrorists, managing public information, the impact of international tribunals on a peace process, property restitution, constitution making, assessing and enhancing ripeness, debriefing a mediation effort, and Track II peacemaking among others.

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9781601270375
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9781601271259
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February 2009

Those who mediate international conflicts must communicate publicly with a wide variety of audiences, from governments and rebel forces to local and international media, NGOs and IGOs, divided communities and diasporas.

Managing Public Information in a Mediation Process helps mediators identify and develop the resources and strategies they need to reach these audiences. It highlights essential information tasks and functions, discusses key challenges and opportunities, and provides expert guidance on effective approaches. Examples from past mediations illustrate how various strategies have played out in practice.

The handbook sets out six steps that can be undertaken by mediators and their information teams before, during, and after peace negotiations:

• Analyze the Information Environment
• Plan Early for Information Needs
• Design a Public Information Strategy
• Implement a Communication Program
• Engage Civil Society
• Monitor, Evaluate, Assess

Following Managing a Mediation Process, this volume is the second handbook in the Peacemaker’s Toolkit series. Each handbook addresses a particular facet of the work of mediating violent conflicts, including such topics as negotiating with terrorists, constitution making, assessing and enhancing ripeness, and Track-II peacemaking.

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9781601270412
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9781601271266
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A Teaching Resource
Edited by David J. Smith
June 2013

Offering lifelong and developmental learning to over 13 million students at nearly 1,200 schools, community colleges in the United States attract a student body with remarkable economic, ethnic, and cultural diversity. They provide students with skills and foundational knowledge upon which successful professional careers and rewarding personal engagement can be built. This identity makes community colleges uniquely suited to teach global awareness and community building. Yet the development of peacebuilding and conflict resolution curricula is still a relatively new effort at these institutions.

In Peacebuilding in Community Colleges, David Smith underscores the importance of community colleges in strengthening global education and teaching conflict resolution skills. Enlisting contributions by twenty-three community college professionals, Smith has created a first-of-its-kind volume for faculty and administrators seeking to develop innovative and engaging peacebuilding and conflict resolution programs. Through case studies, how-to’s, sample syllabi and course materials, and inspiring anecdotes, contributors draw on learner-centered strategies, experiential learning, and interdisciplinary relationships to teach practical skills and strengthen global connections.

The contributors are sensitive to the complexity of teaching a community college student body that often closely reflects the diversity of the local population. They discuss the challenges and opportunities presented by different learning communities—including, for example, significant military, diaspora, and religious populations among their student bodies. Providing a common frame of analysis, Smith discusses important trends and future challenges for community colleges teaching peacebuilding, such as the transferability of credits to four-year institutions and the need to establish skills-based programs that can lead to defined and better employment opportunities. This volume is certain to be an invaluable resource in the field of peacebuilding education.

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9781601271471
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9781601271679
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Conflict Resolution during South Africa's Transition to Democracy
June 2000

A compelling, inspiring account of peacemaking in action, Watching the Wind takes us to the front lines of South Africa's struggle to manage the tempestuous transition from apartheid to democracy.

When Mandela, de Klerk, and other political leaders launched the 1991 National Peace Accord in a far-reaching effort to staunch political bloodshed and promote consultation and cooperation between bitter adversaries, Susan Collin Marks was one of thousands of South Africans who committed themselves to making the peace process work where it mattered most—at the local level. Over the next three years, Marks and other leaders of the conflict resolution movement adopted and adapted a vast array of tools and techniques: they mediated, facilitated, and counseled; they created forums for open discussion and trained community leaders; they fostered community policing; and they anticipated crises and stood between demonstrators and security forces.

And, as Marks explains, “something extraordinary happened.” The international community had expected a bloodbath, but what it saw instead was a near-miraculous process of negotiation and accommodation. With passion and eloquence, the author captures the drama, the personalities, and the heroism of this grassroots peace process.

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9781878379993
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Illuminating the Unseen
September 2015

Many women working for peace around the world are motivated by their religious beliefs, whether they work within secular or religious organizations. These women often find themselves sidelined or excluded from mainstream peacebuilding efforts. Secular organizations can be uncomfortable working with religious groups. Meanwhile, religious institutions often dissuade or even disallow women from leadership positions. Women, Religion, and Peacebuilding: Illuminating the Unseen shows how women determined to work for peace have faced these obstacles in ingenious ways—suggesting, by example, ways that religious and secular organizations might better include them in larger peacebuilding campaigns and make those campaigns more effective in ending conflict.

The first part of the book examines the particular dynamics of women of faith working toward peace within Catholicism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Judaism. The second part contains case studies of women peacebuilders in Africa, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia, detailing how their faiths have informed their work, what roles religious institutions have played as they have moved forward, what accomplishments have resulted from their efforts, and what challenges remain. An appendix of interviews offers further perspectives from peacebuilders, both women and men.

Ultimately, Women, Religion, and Peacebuilding is a call to change the paradigm of peacebuilding inside and outside of the world’s faiths, to strengthen women’s abilities to work for peace and, in turn, improve the chances that major efforts to end conflicts around the world succeed.

EDITORS: Susan Hayward and Katherine Marshall

CONTRIBUTORS: Maryann Cusimano Love • S. Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana • Dena Merriam • Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen • Margaret Jenkins • Bilkisu Yusuf • Kathleen McGarvey • Etin Anwar • Andrea K. Blanch • Esther Hertzog • Ibtisam Mahameed • Zilka Spahic Šiljak • Mónica A. Maher • Anjana Dayal Prewitt • Jacqueline Ogega

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9781601272928
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9781601273024
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