Following its mandate to promote the prevention, management, and peaceful resolution of international conflicts, USIP is committed to publishing significant works that offer new insights. Starting with four titles in the fall of 1991, USIP Press Books has published more than two hundred titles on peacebuilding, conflict analysis, and international relations. You can check out our global reach in this USIP Press Influence Map, indicating subjects covered in our recent and key publications. Please see our forthcoming and most recent books below and search for more titles by subject, title, author, or series.

New Books

Glossary of Terms for Conflict Management and Peacebuilding
Edited by Dan Snodderly
April 2018
An extensive glossary with short definitions of a wide range of complex and often confusing terms used in the field of peacebuilding.
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9781601276919
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9781601277107
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Strategies and Tactics for Conflict-Affected Societies
July 2017

Serious crimes—such as violent extremism, political violence, organized crime, and
corruption—fuel violent conflict and thwart peacebuilding efforts. Fragile states with
weak institutions and governance are unable to stem the tide of threats that serious
crimes pose to peace. The consequences are all too evident across the globe: countries
engulfed in political turmoil, conflicts that spiral into devastating wars, and tides
of refugees fleeing instability and violence.

Fighting Serious Crimes: Strategies and Tactics for Conflict-Affected Societies is an
invaluable resource for anyone battling serious crimes in societies seeking to avoid
conflict, to escape from violence, or to recover and rebuild. Packed with practical
guidance, this volume includes real-world examples from more than twenty of today’s
conflict zones, including Libya, Yemen, Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia, and Colombia. All
the major challenges are covered, from initial assessment to legal and institutional
reform, investigation to prosecution, criminal intelligence to witness protection, the
use of international tribunals to the role of international military forces. The volume
draws on the firsthand experience of dozens of practitioners, distilling what they have
learned into clearly organized and highly readable text that is supplemented by checklists
and sidebars that help readers conduct assessments, identify international and
regional legal instruments (such as treaties), and complete a host of other key tasks.

Contributors: Elaine Banar • Adalbert Gross • Michael Hartmann • Deborah Isser • Andrew Mackay • Vivienne O’Connor • David C. Ralston • Colette Rausch • Thomas Stevenson

Experts: Thomas Barfield • Kurt W. Bassuener • Hudson Benzu • Roberto Courtney • Felipe De La Torre • Christian De Vos • Fidelma Donlon • Michael J. Dziedzic • Charles Erdmann • Larry Gwaltney • Isabel Hight • Christiana Hoffman • Alex Innes • Goran Klemencic • Agnieszka Klonowiecka-Milart • Peter Korneck • Neil J. Kritz • Kenneth Lowrie • Leanne McKay • Joyce Kasee Mills • Marco Maria Monaco • Assad Mubarak • Maria Nystedt •Bruce Ohr • Bruce “Ossie” Oswald • Michael Platzer • David Reddin • Ali Saleem • Govind Prasad Thapa • Kim Thomas • Horst Tiemann • Catherine Volz • Abla Gadegbeku Williams • Gerard Winter

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9781601276292
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Violence Prevention at the Polls
Edited by Jonas Claes
January 2017

Electing Peace: Violence Prevention and Impact at the Polls examines election
violence prevention and assesses the effectiveness of different prevention practices—
which are effective, which are not, and under what circumstances.
Targeted peacebuilding efforts are frequently used to prevent election violence.
Practitioners possess a variety of programming options, including peace messaging
campaigns, preventive diplomacy, and monitoring missions. But the ability of
election violence prevention to achieve its intended outcome merits further investigation.

This edited volume focuses on five electoral democracies: Honduras,
Bangladesh, Thailand, Malawi, and Moldova. During their most recent election cycle,
all five countries displayed similar risk levels but experienced differing levels of
electoral violence. Through these case studies and comparative analysis, the authors
assess the impact of prevention efforts on the levels of violence and derive lessons learned
that can be applied in other electoral contexts.

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9781601275226
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A New U.S. Approach
March 2016

Prioritizing Security Sector Reform: A New U.S. Approach argues that security sector reform (SSR) should be at the core of a new U.S. policy to strengthen the security sector capacity of countries where U.S. interests are at stake. As the United States withdraws from a more interventionist policy, it cannot wholly ignore the growing disorder in fragile environments around the globe. In place of large, boots-on-the-ground interventions relying on expensive train and equip programs with only fleeting impact, the United States needs a smarter tool that can address both the effectiveness and accountability of host nation security forces and institutions. Properly designed and implemented, SSR can be that tool.

Today’s fragile environments feature a host of postconflict and postauthoritarian states and transitioning and new democracies that have at least one critical thing in common: Their security sectors are dysfunctional. Why these states cannot fulfill their most basic function—the protection of the population and their government—varies widely, but the underlying reason is the same. The security sector does not function because security sector institutions and forces are absent, ineffective, predatory, or illegitimate.

Washington needs a new approach for engaging in fragile environments and a policy for prioritizing where it engages and for what purpose. Improving these governments’ ability to deliver security appropriately, effectively, and in accordance with the rule of law could well shift the battle in their favor, with lasting implications for the fragile state, the broader region, and for the United States. The focus of this book is how the United States should design and implement a security sector reform policy.

In the earlier chapters of the volume, the principles underlying security sector reform are examined. Three case studies—Libya, Tunisia, and Mexico—highlight the types of environments in which the United States will likely need an SSR approach and the capabilities required for each. The volume then analyzes the UK and Canadian security sector reform policy experiences, drawing lessons and recommendations for the United States. Next, existing U.S. policy and capabilities for security sector reform are explored. Finally, the volume maps out a new U.S. approach and policy for security sector reform—including a proposed security sector reform Presidential Policy Directive.

"Querine Hanlon and Richard Schultz’s new book Prioritizing Security Sector Reform not only deftly reaffirms the critical importance of security sector reform to stabilize fragile and conflict-affected states, but also outlines a cogent and comprehensive policy framework to reinvent U.S. security sector assistance. This book is a welcome addition to the existing literature on SSR and should become required reading for U.S. government officials engaged in any facet of overseas security assistance."

—Dr. Mark Sedra, Executive Director, Centre for Security Governance

"Prioritizing Security Sector Reform drives home why security sector reform is a complex and central policy problem. It is crucial to both combating violent extremism and to enlarging just governance. This volume offers a variety of insights from British and Canadian techniques and the most significant contemporary cases of Libya, Tunisia, and Mexico, as well as offering a crisp, unified vision for U.S. policy approaches and tools. Its recommendations will be useful to policymakers and thought-provoking to academic students and analysts."
 
—Mark P. Lagon, PhD, President, Freedom House

"Given today’s global volatilities, America’s interest in helping our allies and partners build their security force capacity will likely get stronger in the years ahead. Recent history shows how challenging it can be to generate foreign military and police forces that are operationally proficient, sustainable, professional and well-governed, and hence viewed as guardians of peace and security by their fellow citizens. Querine Hanlon and Richard Schultz have developed a book that provides much-needed conversation on security sector reform."

— James A. Schear, former Deputy Assistant Secretary for Partnership Strategy at DOD



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9781601273130
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9781601275721
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Illuminating the Unseen
September 2015

Many women working for peace around the world are motivated by their religious beliefs, whether they work within secular or religious organizations. These women often find themselves sidelined or excluded from mainstream peacebuilding efforts. Secular organizations can be uncomfortable working with religious groups. Meanwhile, religious institutions often dissuade or even disallow women from leadership positions. Women, Religion, and Peacebuilding: Illuminating the Unseen shows how women determined to work for peace have faced these obstacles in ingenious ways—suggesting, by example, ways that religious and secular organizations might better include them in larger peacebuilding campaigns and make those campaigns more effective in ending conflict.

The first part of the book examines the particular dynamics of women of faith working toward peace within Catholicism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Judaism. The second part contains case studies of women peacebuilders in Africa, Latin America, Europe, the Middle East, and Asia, detailing how their faiths have informed their work, what roles religious institutions have played as they have moved forward, what accomplishments have resulted from their efforts, and what challenges remain. An appendix of interviews offers further perspectives from peacebuilders, both women and men.

Ultimately, Women, Religion, and Peacebuilding is a call to change the paradigm of peacebuilding inside and outside of the world’s faiths, to strengthen women’s abilities to work for peace and, in turn, improve the chances that major efforts to end conflicts around the world succeed.

EDITORS: Susan Hayward and Katherine Marshall

CONTRIBUTORS: Maryann Cusimano Love • S. Ayse Kadayifci-Orellana • Dena Merriam • Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen • Margaret Jenkins • Bilkisu Yusuf • Kathleen McGarvey • Etin Anwar • Andrea K. Blanch • Esther Hertzog • Ibtisam Mahameed • Zilka Spahic Šiljak • Mónica A. Maher • Anjana Dayal Prewitt • Jacqueline Ogega

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9781601272928
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9781601273024
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January 2015

In an era of increasing dispersion of political will and authority in the international system, the approaches to and methodologies for peacemaking are changing. "Managing Conflict in a World Adrift" provides a sobering panorama of contemporary conflict along with innovative thinking about how to respond now that new forces and dynamics are at play.

"Managing Conflict in a World Adrift", the fourth volume in the landmark series edited by Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, and Pamela Aall, replaces "Leashing the Dogs of War" as the definitive text on the sources of conflict and solutions for preventing and managing conflict. Forty of the most influential analysts of international affairs present varied perspectives and insightful thinking to inform a new framework for understanding current demands of conflict management. This framework is based on three key questions:

• Are we in the midst of a global political shift where power moves from central institutions to smaller, more distributed units?
• What is the nature of the relationship between political, social, or economic change and the outbreak and spread of conflict?
• And what are the consequences of these factors for conflict management?

Emerging systemic and societal transformations call for the fresh thinking and approaches to peacemaking featured in "Managing Conflict in a World Adrift". Crocker, Hampson, and Aall bring together leading authorities in the field to guide students and practitioners of international relations and conflict management in a time of ambiguous and asymmetrical world order. Peacemakers of today and tomorrow will gain from this text a broad and deep understanding of the current situation along with the strategies and skills needed to prevent and resolve conflict.

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9781601272225
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9781601272232
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July 2014

NATO has come under increasing fire for its structural constraints, shortcomings in burden sharing among its members, and disagreements about threat assessments and priorities. Despite these serious challenges, longtime NATO watcher David Yost argues that the Alliance is no Cold War dinosaur.

NATO’s Balancing Act evaluates the alliance’s performance of its three core tasks—collective defense, crisis management, and cooperative security—and reviews its members’ efforts to achieve the right balance among them. NATO has retained its original collective defense and positive political change missions, but it has also undertaken crisis management operations and addressed nontraditional threats, such as energy and cyber security, terrorism, and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.

This volume examines the evolving security environment and its implications for collective defense before turning to the Alliance’s crisis management efforts in the Balkans, Afghanistan, Africa, and Libya. Yost also considers the possibility of NATO’s further enlargement, the complexities of its partnerships with other international organizations, and its shifting relationships with Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Mediterranean and
Persian Gulf states, and the Asia-Pacific region.

Whether NATO can maintain cohesion and perform its tasks effectively is a question of fundamental importance for U.S. and international security. NATO’s Balancing Act calls for a constructive path forward, including balanced engagement with Russia, missions beyond Europe as necessary, and enhanced partnerships with international organizations and nations.

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9781601272027
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9781601272034
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Through a Peacebuilding Lens
Edited by Moeed Yusuf
May 2014

Insurgency and Counterinsurgency in South Asia underscores the need for South Asian decision makers and relevant actors around the world to systematically examine the nature of intrastate insurgent movements. Using the "conflict curve" theory of conflict evolution, ten experts native to South Asia consider the trajectories of four of the most salient armed insurgencies in a region that has experienced many such sustained conflicts and the counterinsurgent response to each. Case studies on India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Sri Lanka lend important lessons on the dynamics of each conflict while collectively offering insights into how and why insurgencies occur and transform as well as how they can be prevented or resolved.

Through a peacebuilding lens, the contributors ask, What incentives led resentful groups to resort to armed insurgency? And, once insurgency was under way, how was it managed?

While many studies of insurgency and counterinsurgency emphasize military tactics and terrorism responses, this volume hones in on policy-relevant conclusions pertinent to the peacebuilding field. Detailed maps created especially for this volume illustrate conflict regions. Emphasizing nonviolent means to prevent or mitigate conflict, Yusuf and the contributors highlight the opportunities and constraints in applying peacebuilding approaches across the conflict curve, identifying recommendations for the disputing parties as well as for peacebuilders.

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9781601271914
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9781601271921
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Osama bin Laden, the Taliban, and the Hijacking of Afghanistan
December 2013

In How We Missed the Story, Second Edition, Pulitzer prize-winning journalist Roy Gutman extends his investigation into why two successive U.S. administrations failed to head off the assaults of 9/11 and to look at the U.S. military intervention that followed. With American forces due to withdraw in 2014 from a country far from stable, he suggests that the longest ever U.S. military intervention was doomed by the same flawed outlook that prevailed in the 1990s. During that twenty-five-year span, U.S. policymakers showed little interest in the country's history and culture and assumed Afghanistan could serve principally as a platform for attacking U.S. foes. Gutman contends that the key to preventing a reversion to radical jihadism lies in acknowledging the enormous sacrifices Afghans made in the 1980s war and and committing to the country's long-term stability. Anyone who thinks Afghanistan doesn't matter, or that Washington can walk away once again, is "missing the story."

Expanded by nearly a third, this new edition focuses on American missteps from 1989 through 2012. Gutman draws upon his own research and interviews, beginning with the Soviet withdrawal that gave way to the American withdrawal of the 1990s and the ensuing security vacuum Islamic militants used to American detriment. While many political figures and outside observers blame the U.S. lack of preparedness for the 9/11 attacks on intelligence and law enforcement agencies, Gutman argues that the strategic failure prior to 9/11 lay in U.S. foreign policy. Addressing 9/11 solely with a counterterrorism approach, Washington "missed the story" and failed to put things right. By going to war in Iraq, it effectively abandoned Afghanistan again. This study also illuminates American engagement in the broader world after the Cold War and asks: Whatever happened to foreign policy?

Anyone who wants to avoid repeating the mistakes of the past, whether a general reader, scholar, or government official needs to know How We Missed the Story.

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9781601271464
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9781601273161
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December 2013

As the United States and NATO prepare to withdraw their troops from Afghanistan in 2014, the question remains as to what sort of political settlement the Afghanistan government and the Taliban can reach in order to achieve sustainable peace. If all parties are willing to strike a deal, how might the negotiations be structured, and what might the shape of that deal be? Getting It Right in Afghanistan addresses the real drivers of the insurgency and how Afghanistan's neighbors can contribute to peace in the region.

A recurring theme throughout the volume is the complex, multiactor conflict environment in Afghanistan and the resulting need for more inclusive political arrangements. The first set of chapters focus on internal political dynamics and Afghan political actors' views on a peace process. The second section covers Afghanistan's neighbors and their role in shaping the country's internal politics. Efforts to date to implement a peace and reconciliation process for Afghanistan are covered in the final section. Taken together, the book conveys the complexity and challenge of building an enduring and stable political consensus in Afghanistan's fragmented environment.

Since beginning work in Afghanistan in 2002, the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) has been informing policy through accurate, clear analysis of the conflict that could shape a negotiated settlement. Comprising a collection of its analysis from 2002 to the present, Getting It Right in Afghanistan offers valuable insights to the policymakers charged with developing a new course of action for contributing to peace in Afghanistan and regional stability.

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9781601271822
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9781601271792
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