Author's Books

January 2015

In an era of increasing dispersion of political will and authority in the international system, the approaches to and methodologies for peacemaking are changing. "Managing Conflict in a World Adrift" provides a sobering panorama of contemporary conflict along with innovative thinking about how to respond now that new forces and dynamics are at play.

"Managing Conflict in a World Adrift", the fourth volume in the landmark series edited by Chester A. Crocker, Fen Osler Hampson, and Pamela Aall, replaces "Leashing the Dogs of War" as the definitive text on the sources of conflict and solutions for preventing and managing conflict. Forty of the most influential analysts of international affairs present varied perspectives and insightful thinking to inform a new framework for understanding current demands of conflict management. This framework is based on three key questions:

• Are we in the midst of a global political shift where power moves from central institutions to smaller, more distributed units?
• What is the nature of the relationship between political, social, or economic change and the outbreak and spread of conflict?
• And what are the consequences of these factors for conflict management?

Emerging systemic and societal transformations call for the fresh thinking and approaches to peacemaking featured in "Managing Conflict in a World Adrift". Crocker, Hampson, and Aall bring together leading authorities in the field to guide students and practitioners of international relations and conflict management in a time of ambiguous and asymmetrical world order. Peacemakers of today and tomorrow will gain from this text a broad and deep understanding of the current situation along with the strategies and skills needed to prevent and resolve conflict.

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9781601272225
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9781601272232
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July 2011

The Cold War’s end and the events of 9/11 upended traditional notions of global security. Where superpower rivalry once dominated the field, security is now increasingly fragmented and decentralized. Nowhere is this more evident than in the world’s regions, which face very different security threats and have evolved very different means to address those threats. But do regions, ever more distrustful of global institutions, have the capacity to deal with the broadening array of security challenges they face? Do they have innovative approaches that strengthen or fragment the world’s capacity to respond to new threats?

Rewiring Regional Security in a Fragmented World examines conflict management capacities and gaps regionally and globally, and assesses whether regions—through their regional organizations or through loose coalitions of states, regional bodies, and non-official actors—are able to address an array of new and emerging security threats. The volume offers a unique comparative perspective on the changing threats to security and new approaches to conflict management as seen by experts from Africa, the Middle East, Europe, Russia and Central Asia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, Latin America, Central America, and the trans-Atlantic community.

The volume’s editors, longstanding contributors to the field of conflict management, have tapped deeply knowledgeable contributors to develop conceptual links between the fields of security and conflict management and expand our understanding of global conflict management capacity and the balance between regional/local security initiatives and global ones.



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9781601270702
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9781601271013
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Conflict Management in a Divided World
January 2007

Leashing the Dogs of War receives Outstanding Academic Title Award by the library journal CHOICE. Read the CHOICE review at http://www.usip.org/newsmedia/ crocker_hampson_all/index.html.

Since Turbulent Peace was first published in 2001, the international landscape has changed profoundly. Leashing the Dogs of War replaces its well-established predecessor as the definitive volume on the sources of contemporary conflict and the array of possible responses to it. The authors—more than forty of the most influential and innovative analysts of international affairs—present multiple perspectives on how best to prevent, manage, or resolve conflicts around the world.

Leashing the Dogs of War assesses the nature and extent of the changes wrought by 9/11 and its aftermath, and explores their wide-ranging implications. For the United States, of course, the changes have been dramatic. It has engaged in a war on terrorism and has become both a third party in certain conflict arenas and a direct party to the conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan. But these events have also affected other actors, from the United Nations to humanitarian NGOs to collective defense and security organizations such as NATO and the OSCE.

At the same time, some things have not changed. Failed states, economic stagnation, weapons proliferation, nuclear missiles, and identity-based conflicts continue to threaten global security. Looking at the combination of old and new threats, are traditional instruments of negotiation, mediation, peacekeeping and peace enforcement still effective in managing and resolving conflict? How do conflict management efforts and the campaign against terrorism interact in various security environments? Are our institutions—be they states, coalitions of the willing, international organizations, or NGOs—capable of creating and implementing a peacemaking strategy? All these questions are addressed in this new volume.

Authoritative, provocative, and insightful, Leashing the Dogs of War offers an unparalleled breadth and depth of analysis of conflict in today’s world. It is a “must read” not only for students of international relations and conflict resolution but also for anyone—in government and outside—seeking to understand the dynamics of contemporary conflict and the best means of resolving it.

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9781929223961
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9781601275738
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9781929223978
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Analyzing Cases of Intractable Conflict
February 2005

Among the unwelcome legacies of the past century are a group of conflicts, both intrastate and interstate, that seem destined never to end. From Kashmir to Nagorno-Karabakh, Colombia to Sudan, the Korean Peninsula to the Middle East, these deeply entrenched, intermittently violent conflicts have so far resisted all outside efforts to resolve them.

What lessons—aside from the apparent futility of mediation—can such dismal situations possibly offer? As the distinguished contributors to Grasping the Nettle make plain, this is not a rhetorical question. Unyielding conflicts offer numerous insights—not only about the sources of intractability but also about such facets of mediation and conflict management as how to gain leverage, when to engage and disengage, how to balance competing goals, and who to enlist to play supporting roles.

The first part of this eye-opening volume identifies and analyzes the defining characteristics and underlying dynamics of intractable conflicts. The second part turns the spotlight on no fewer than eight current cases, in each instance chronicling the conflict's evolution, evaluating the internal and external factors that have conspired to prevent a settlement, and assessing whether past peacemaking initiatives have in fact only aggravated the conflict. The conclusion makes the point that even intractable conflicts eventually end and highlights the strategic approaches and tactical steps that have yielded success in the past for mediators and conflict managers from governments, international organizations, and NGOs.

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9781929223602
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9781929223619
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Mediation in the Hardest Cases
August 2004

Some conflicts seem to defy resolution. Marked by longevity, recurrent violence, and militant agendas, these intractable conflicts refuse to be settled either on the battlefield or at the negotiating table. The longer they fester, the stronger the international community's inclination to lose heart and to turn away. But, explain the authors of this provocative volume, effective mediation in intractable conflicts is possible—if the mediator knows what to do and when to do it.

Written from the mediator's point of view, Taming Intractable Conflicts lays out the steps involved in tackling the most stubborn of conflicts. It first puts mediation in a larger context, exploring why mediators choose or decline to become involved, what happens when they get involved for the wrong reasons, and the impact of the mediator's institutional and political environment. It then discusses best mediation tradecraft at different stages: at the beginning of the engagement, when the going gets very rough, during the settlement negotiations, and in the post-settlement implementation stage.

Forceful, concise, and highly readable, Taming Intractable Conflicts serves not only as a hands–on guide for would-be mediators but also as a powerful argument for students of conflict management that intractable conflicts are not beyond the reach of mediation.

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9781929223558
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9781601270894
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9781929223565
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The Challenges of Managing International Conflict
August 2001

Please see the new, replacement volume Leashing the Dogs of War.

Like its predecessor, Managing Global Chaos, this comprehensive volume explores the sources of contemporary conflict and the vast array of possible responses to it. The authors—50 of the most influential and innovative analysts of international affairs—present multiple perspectives on how best to prevent, manage, or resolve conflicts around the world.

In the five years since Managing Global Chaos was published, the geopolitical landscape has changed in significant ways and we have learned important lessons. Turbulent Peace underlines the volatility and vulnerability of states and peoples in a world that is both increasingly interconnected and ever more differentiated and decentralized in its political and social structures. Four new themes emerge from Turbulent Peace: the return of geopolitics; the recognition that different societies require different peacemaking strategies; the pull and tug between conflict management and post-conflict governance issues, such as democratization; and the understanding that creating a sustainable peace is as difficult as making peace in the first place.

Although this volume features many of the contributors to Managing Global Chaos (in most cases with updated and revised chapters), almost 70 percent of the contributors are new. The editors commissioned the new essays to address emergent themes in conflict analysis and management, to offer a wide range of viewpoints in contentious areas, and to respond to feedback from readers and the needs of educators. The result is a volume of unparalleled breadth and depth, an invaluable resource for teachers and students no less than for practitioners and policymakers.

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9781929223275
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December 2000

Please see the newest, replacement volume Guide for Participants in Peace, Stability, and Relief Operations.

Peace and relief operations are always tough assignments. But they can be tougher still when you find yourself working alongside people who seem to have very different outlooks, approaches, and priorities. It is a problem that has grown significantly over the past decade, with many operations now bringing together intergovernmental organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and the military.

Developed specifically to dispel misconceptions and promote cooperation, Guide to IGOs, NGOs, and the Military gives readers the opportunity to develop a basic understanding of these leading players in peace and relief operations. For each type, the handbook presents its organizational philosophy and culture, internal structure, and working practices. It offers a series of quick but recognizable sketches, showing both the general characteristics and the most important variations.

The guide provides fact-filled profiles of dozens of the leading IGOs and NGOs. The Military section shows readers how to identify the service, rank, and specialty of military personnel and the weapons and other equipment most likely to be seen in the field. A variety of graphics and tables aid understanding and identification.

Designed to be taken into the field, the guide is compact, durable, and lightweight, with tabs and indexes that make it easy to find specific information.

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9781929223053
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Multiparty Mediation in a Complex World
November 1999

An illustrious cast of practitioners here describe their personal experiences in working to bring peace in significant conflicts across four continents. As James Baker, Richard Holbrooke, Max van der Stoel, Alvaro de Soto, Aldo Ajello, and others make clear, the mediator must operate in an environment of daunting complexity, insecurity, and uncertainty. Whether sequestered in Norway or zigzagging across Africa, the mediator can take nothing for granted—not participants, agendas, or timetables—in the struggle to sustain and advance the peace process.

And just to make things more complicated, each conflict now typically attracts several independent mediators. Indeed, coordinating third party mediators is like herding cats—difficult if not impossible.

In each of the two dozen cases examined in this volume, mediation was a multiparty effort, involving a range of actors—individuals, states, international organizations, and NGOs—working simultaneously or sequentially. These vivid accounts attest to the crucial importance of coordinating and building upon the efforts of other players. They also illuminate the opportunities and problems presented by different entry points of mediation—from conflict prevention, through negotiation during active conflict, to post-settlement implementation and peacebuilding—and by different kinds of leverage, levels of engagement, and objectives.

This volume was developed by the same editors who were responsible for USIP Press's highly successful 1996 publication Managing Global Chaos and is intended as a follow-on to that book. In their feedback on the 1996 volume, readers requested additional resources, especially case studies that reflect real, hands-on experience in complex settings. Not only will these cases illustrate how multiparty mediation works or does not work, but they should also stimulate further work on the special requirements and best practices of the field, promote a dialogue among practitioners themselves as well as between academics and practitioners, and lead to unique insights, new understandings, and alternative approaches that can be applied to future mediations.

The editors have framed the volume with discussions that link the practitioner cases to the scholarly literature on mediation, thereby situating the case studies in terms of theory while also drawing lessons for both scholars and practitioners that can help guide future endeavors.

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9781878379924
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9781601271204
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9781878379931
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Sources of and Responses to International Conflict
September 1996

Please see the newest, replacement volume Leashing the Dogs of War.

A resurgence of ethnonationalism, the collapse of empires the outbreak of humanitarian crises, and growing pressures on weakened states are substantially altering world politics. While a new international system has not yet emerged to replace the Cold War system, conflict within and between states continues at a high level, posing a sever challenge to diplomats and citizens in the United States and other countries.

In response to numerous requests from teachers and practitioners, and with the assistance of an advisory board of eminent scholars and policymakers, the editors have developed this unique and comprehensive volume. Some 40 essays probe traditional and emerging sources of conflict and explore the full range of instruments, actors, techniques, and policies for managing and resolving conflict—ranging from combat intervention, collective security, and UN peacekeeping to preventive diplomacy problem-solving workshops, and the strengthening of civil society.

The book includes seven case studies and numerous chapters that feature comparative and cross-cutting analysis. The purpose of the volume is to fill the vacuum created by recent global change that has dramatically altered the context for both the teaching and the practice of international relations. It will support teaching of international relations at colleges and universities and be equally useful to diplomats, military officers, international civil servants, and practitioners of humanitarian relief and conflict resolution in nongovernmental organizations.

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9781878379580
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9781878379597
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