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An Insider’s Account of the Peace Process
August 1998

Since independence, Angola has witnessed twenty-plus years of civil war and a string of broken peace agreements. “It is not difficult to be a cynic about Angola,” notes Ambassador Paul Hare. Yet Hare and other dedicated diplomats have continued to persevere in their quest for a lasting solution to the Angolan conflict.

In this behind-the-scenes account of the negotiation and implementation of the 1994 Lusaka Protocol, Hare describes how representatives of the United Nations and “the Troika” (the United States, Russia, and Portugal) launched negotiations with the rebel forces of UNITA, led by Jonas Savimbi, and the Dos Santos government to address their differences and plot a peaceful course for the country’s future. Angola’s Last Best Chance for Peace offers a revealing picture of the interplay of personalities and policy agendas in this large, resource-rich country.

In this exceptionally well-written book, Hare follows the uneven process of implementation through to 1998, concluding with a look at the lessons of Angola for other conflicts, both in Africa and elsewhere.

Paperback
9781878379801
$14.95
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Understanding Causes, Unlocking Solutions
June 2013

The change in the patterns and nature of deadly conflicts since the end of the Cold War has spurred many organizations in and outside governments to develop robust strategies to anticipate, prevent, and respond to these conflicts. Conflict analysis is the critical
first step toward meeting these objectives.

Conflict Analysis: Understanding Causes, Unlocking Solutions is a guide for practitioners seeking to prevent deadly conflict or mitigate political instability. Governments, nongovernmental organizations, and businesses operating in conflict zones will find this volume to be a practical, accessible reference for understanding and communicating persuasively about threats of organized violence. This handbook integrates theory and practice and emphasizes the importance of analyzing the causes of peace as well as the causes of conflict. It stresses that conflict analysis is a social as well as an intellectual process, helping practitioners translate analysis into effective action.

To illustrate key points, Levinger draws on both historical and contemporary cases, including the Cuban missile crisis, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the Yugoslav wars of secession, the Rwandan genocide, the 9/11 attacks, and the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Part I examines contemporary global conflict trends, perspectives on the causes of conflict and peace, and quantitative models for early warning and risk assessment. Part II provides practitioners with a menu of analytical tools for systematically assessing causes and potential trajectories of deadly conflicts. Part III focuses on the role of conflict analysis in decision making and program implementation, including the social dimensions of conflict analysis.

The analytical tools in this volume illuminate emerging trends in complex, volatile, and ambiguous environments and will enable practitioners to anticipate and respond with greater agility to threats and opportunities.

Paperback
9781601271433
$24.95
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E-Book
9781601271662
$24.95
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Conflict and Cooperation over Energy, Resources, and Pollution
October 2007


Northeast Asia is a region with highly disparate levels of industrialization and political systems. It also contains some very troubling security flashpoints—the Taiwan Strait, the Korean Peninsula, and the East China Sea. China’s rapacious quest for energy and rapid industrial expansion have led to intense international competition—with Japan and the United States—and internal instability as well. North Korea poses two distinct environmental security threats: “famine refugees” and the regime’s use of “nuclear blackmail” for subsidized energy. Yet there is very little regional cooperation, despite the need to manage disputes over energy, natural resources, and pervasive pollution. The Environmental Dimension of Asian Security examines these issues through a “regional environmental security complex” that explores the potential for greater intersubjective understandings of regional environmental and natural resource problems and greater institutional collaboration and management.

Paperback
9781929223732
$19.95
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Hardback
9781929223749
$50.00
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Conflict and Cooperation in International River Basins
August 1999

With more than 50 percent of the world’s landmass covered by river basins shared by two or more states, competition over water resources has always had the potential to spark violence. And growing populations and accelerating demands for fresh water are putting ever greater pressures on already scarce water resources.

In this wide-ranging study, Arun Elhance explores the hydropolitics of six of the world’s largest river basins. In each case, Elhance examines the basin’s physical, economic, and political geography; the possibilities for acute conflict; and efforts to develop bilateral and multilateral agreements for sharing water resources.

The case studies lead to some sobering conclusions about impediments to cooperation but also to some encouraging ones—among them, that it may not be possible for Third World states to solve their water problems by going to war, and that eventually even the strongest riparian states are compelled to seek cooperation with their weaker neighbors.

Paperback
9781878379900
$19.95
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Hardback
9781878379917
$37.50
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Does Business Have a Role in Peacemaking?
March 2007

Until recently, oil companies saw the socioeconomic consequences of their operations in developing countries as beyond their control. But with mounting activist pressure at home, growing interest in “corporate social responsibility,” and the spiraling costs of conflict in production areas, the oil industry is now playing an increasing role in how a country’s oil and gas are extracted, how its people fare, and ultimately, where the revenues go. Jill Shankleman’s timely and highly informative book Oil, Profits, and Peace presents an evenhanded and insightful picture of the obstacles, fiscal incentives, and growing potential for Western oil companies to ameliorate or even prevent conflict in the areas where they operate.

Drawing on years of field experience and new data from corporations, NGOs, and hundreds of personal interviews, the author explores the links between oil and conflict, and changing notions and forms of corporate responsibility. Oil, Profits, and Peace spotlights three oil-dependent countries—Angola, Azerbaijan, and Sudan—that have had very different experiences with conflict and the oil industry, and concludes with recommendations for government and corporate policymakers. As a matter of enlightened self-interest, more and more companies are collaborating in novel ways with governments, international organizations, and NGOs to limit environmental damage, provide local jobs, increase transparency, and enhance the chances of sustaining both profits and peace.

Paperback
9781929223985
$17.50
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Hardback
9781929223992
$35.00
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