U.S. Institute of Peace Press

HOW PAKISTAN NEGOTIATES WITH THE UNITED STATES
Riding the Roller Coaster


(click for larger cover)

 $45.00 (Cloth)
978-1-60127-085-6


$16.95 $13.50 (Paperback)
978-1-60127-075-7


USIP Press Books
April 2011
210 pp. , 6" x 9"

How Pakistan Negotiates with the United States is an impressive, insightful and truly important book, especially for Americans who cannot decide whether Pakistan is America’s friend or foe. They will learn that the issue is more complex and respective grievances are more reciprocal.
Zbigniew Brzezinski, Counselor and Trustee, Center for Strategic and International Studies

A fascinating account of how Pakistanis have historically used a mix of charm, military polish, occasional deception, guilt trips, pleas of national weakness, knowledge of Afghanistan, and strategically advantageous geography right next to Afghanistan to induce the United States to do more for them. Read the full review here.
Foreign Policy

Over the past sixty years, Pakistan-U.S. relations have been marked by highs of close cooperation and lows of deep bilateral estrangement. Much of the negotiations story underscores the remarkable resilience, but also the vulnerability and volatility of the relationship. Throughout the Cold War and continuing after 9/11, Pakistan’s location has shaped a relationship of mutual interest and asymmetrical goals. The United States views Pakistan as a strategic partner in achieving global security goals; Pakistan looks to the United States as a counterweight to India and its neighbors.

How Pakistan Negotiates with the United States analyzes the themes, techniques, and styles that have characterized Pakistani negotiations with American civilian and military officials since Pakistan’s independence. Drawing from their vast diplomatic experience, authors Teresita and Howard Schaffer examine how Pakistan’s ideological core, geopolitical position, culture, and military and governmental structures shape negotiations with the United States. The authors address not only the process by which the two governments reach formal agreements, but also the overall conduct of official U.S.-Pakistani dialogue, the informal processes that have shaped their diplomatic relationship, and the periodic involvement of the United States in Pakistani domestic politics. This book offers concrete lessons and advice for U.S. officials on how to negotiate most effectively with Pakistan.

Drawing from their vast diplomatic experience, Teresita and Howard Schaffer, authors of "How Pakistan Negotiates with the United States: Riding the Roller Coaster," discuss how Pakistan's ideological core, geopolitical position, culture, and military and governmental structures shape negotiations with the United States.

 

Teresita Schaffer specialized in South Asia and international economics during her thirty-year career in the U.S. Foreign Service. She served in Islamabad and New Delhi (1974-77 and 1977-79), as deputy assistant secretary of state for South Asia (1989–92), as U.S. ambassador to Sri Lanka (1992–95), and as director of the Foreign Service Institute (1995–97). She created and directed the South Asia program at CSIS from 1998-2010.

Howard Schaffer is a professor at Georgetown University’s Institute for the Study of Diplomacy. During his thirty-six year career in the U.S. Foreign Service, he served as ambassador to Bangladesh (1984–87), political counselor at American embassies in India (1977–79) and Pakistan (1974–77), and he was twice deputy assistant secretary of state responsible for South Asian affairs.

Browse Inside the Book

Contents

  • The Burden of History and Geography
  • The Starting Point: Pakistan's Place in the World
  • Between Pakistani and Cosmopolitan Cultures
  • Navigating the Pakistan Government: Military and Intelligence
  • Diplomat's, Civil Servants, and the Problem of Authority
  • Pakistan's Politicians
  • Negotiations at the Top
  • India-Pakistan Negotiations
  • Negotiating with Pakistan: Lessons for Americans

Related Titles

See our list of new and forthcoming titles.

TOP